Archive for June, 2013

General Wayne’s Muster Women in Camp

waynes muster ladies
Did you know that when St. Clair went North to face the Native Americans that over 200 hundred women and children accompanied the troops? These “camp followers”, as they were known, provided much needed assistance and companionship around camp. Many soldiers of this period were accompanied on campaign by their entire family. From cook, cleaner to nurse, the “Women of Camp” were what kept a soldier’s life complete.

Join us here for Wayne’s Muster where the Fourth Sub-Legion’s Women of Camp demonstrate the day to day life of camp. Come sample camp fare as the Ladies cook examples of camp food and discuss the life of a woman in camp.

Join us at Heritage Village Museum June 29th 12-5 and June 30th 10-3 as we present Wayne’s Muster. General Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion will be here to demonstrate the life a soldier during the early years of Cincinnati. Visitors will experience camp life, military drilling, and cooking in our stone kitchen and fire pit by the Sub-Legion’s Women of Camp.

John F. Winkler, author of Wabash 1791 and Fallen Timbers 1794 will be speaking about these conflicts as well as the role early Cincinnati played in the Northwest Indian Wars, 1785-1795.

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Wayne’s Muster #3

waynes muster soldiers
On August 20, 1794, Wayne’s Sub-Legions met the confederated force of Native Americans near present day Toledo, Ohio. The Battle of Fallen Timbers proved to be the decisive battle in the Northwest Territory. Wayne’s Sub-Legions destroyed Native American resistance in Ohio Country. The following year, 1795 saw the signing of the Treaty of Greeneville. This treaty paved the way for further settlement of what would soon be Ohio.

To learn more about the soldiers and this period of history in Cincinnati, join us at Heritage Village Museum Saturday June 29th 12pm-5pm and Saunday June 30th 10am-3pm as we present Wayne’s Muster. General Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion will be here to demonstrate the life a soldier during the early years of Cincinnati. Visitors will experience camp life, military drilling, and cooking in our stone kitchen and fire pit by the Sub-Legion’s Women of Camp.

John F. Winkler, author of Wabash 1791 and Fallen Timbers 1794 will be speaking about these conflicts as well as the role early Cincinnati played in the Northwest Indian Wars, 1785-1795.

Admission is $5 for adults and $3 children 5-11. Admission price includes a guided tour of Heritage Village.

Wayne’s Muster Blog #2

waynelegion
As a result of St. Clair’s disasterous defeat on the Wabash at the hands of the Native Americans, President George Washington turned to Revolutionary War hero, General Anthony Wayne to lead the newly formed Legion of the United States against the loose confederation of tribes in the Ohio Country. Wayne built a training base outside of Pittsburgh known as Legionville. Here, Wayne turned this fledgling army into a formidable fighting force by constant drilling and other training. On April 30, 1793, and after lengthy preparations, this large flotilla of troops floated down the Ohio River to occupy Fort Washington in present day Cincinnati.

Join us here at Heritage Village Museum as we step back to those days with Wayne’s Muster. General Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion will be here to demonstrate the life a soldier during the early years of Cincinnati. Visitors will experience camp life, military drilling, and cooking in our stone kitchen and fire pit by the Sub-Legion’s Women of Camp.

John F. Winkler, author of Wabash 1791 and Fallen Timbers 1794 will be speaking about these conflicts as well as the role early Cincinnati played in the Northwest Indian Wars, 1785-1795.

General Wayne’s Muster

Wayne's MusterDid you know that the United States Army’s worst military defeat happened right here in Ohio? The Battle of the Wabash, also known as St. Clair’s Defeat, occurred in present day Fort Recovery, Ohio in 1791. The United States Army, led by Gen. Arthur St. Clair, left Cincinnati’s Fort Washington in mid-September, 1791, to quell Indian violence by attacking tribal villages along the Wabash River. Instead, the United States Army suffered a humiliating defeat.

This defeat was suffered at the hands of a loose confederation of Miami, Shawnee, Lenape, Wyandot, Mingo Ojibwe, and some Cherokee. This confederation was led by Little Turtle, Captain Pipe, and prominent Ohio Shawnee Chiefs, Blue Jacket and Black Hoof, among others. While exact numbers will never be known, upwards of 1,000 troops were killed or wounded of the 1400 man force. This resulted in a 63% casualty rate for the whole of the fledgling U.S. Army. As a result of this disastrous defeat, violence between Ohio settlers and the Native Tribes increased. Residents of Cincinnati experienced Indian attacks in and around what is now downtown Cincinnati. This and other attacks in nearby areas only stopped after General Anthony Wayne’s decisive defeat of the Native Americans at Fallen Timbers in 1794.

Join us here at Heritage Village as we learn more about this calamitous time in early Cincinnati. John Winkler, author of Osprey’s books, Wabash 1791 and Fallen Timbers 1794, will discuss in depth these two very different yet decisive battles. An encampment of General Anthony Wayne’s Fourth Sub-Legion will also be on hand for our visitors to gain a better insight into soldiering and camp life of the late 1700’s. Join us Saturday, June 29 12:00pm-5:00pm and Sunday June 30 10:00am-3:00pm